Our Wellness Policy

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Wellness Policy

 

Orange Unified School District                                                                                        BP 5030

Wellness Policies for Nutrition and Physical Activity

  • The District is committed to providing school environments that promote and protect children's health, well-being, and ability to learn by supporting healthy eating and physical activity.
  • The school district will engage students, parents, teachers, food service professionals, health professionals, and other interested community members in developing, implementing, monitoring, and reviewing district-wide nutrition and physical activity policies.
  • All students in grades K-12 will have opportunities, support, and encouragement to be physically active on a regular basis.
  • Foods and beverages sold or served at school will meet the nutrition recommendations of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
  • Child nutrition professionals will provide students with access to a variety of affordable, nutritious, and appealing foods that meet the health and nutrition needs of students; will accommodate the religious, ethnic, and cultural diversity of the student body in meal planning.
  • All schools in our district will participate in available federal school meal programs (including the School Breakfast Program, National School Lunch Program and After-school Snack Program.
  • Schools will provide nutrition education and physical education to foster lifelong habits of healthy eating and physical activity, and will establish linkages between health education and school meal programs, and with related community services.
  • Children need access to healthful foods and opportunities to be physically active in order to grow, learn, and thrive;
  • Good health fosters student attendance and education;

Student Wellness & Achievement Committee

The school district and/or individual schools within the district will create, strengthen, or work with existing Wellness for Student Achievement Committee to develop, implement, monitor, review, and, as necessary, revise school nutrition and physical activity policies. The Wellness for Student Achievement Committee will also serve as a resource to school sites for implementing policies. (The Committee consists of a group of individuals representing the school and community, and should include parents, students, and representatives of the school food authority, members of the school board, school administrators, teachers, health professionals, and members of the public.)

Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages Sold and Served on Campus

School Meals- Meals served through the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs should be made attractive to students by appealing to their taste preferences and meeting their cultural needs. School meals not only should provide the optimal nutrition that students need for growth, development, and academic achievement but also should support the development of healthful eating behaviors in students, including their learning to eat a variety of foods should be priced no lower than the cost of providing them so that school food programs are self-supporting.

Programs will

  • be appealing and attractive to children;
  • be served in clean and pleasant settings;
  • meet or exceed nutrition requirements established by state, and federal statutes and regulations;
  • offer a variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables; low-fat, high fiber & lower sodium entrees,
  • serve only low-fat and fat-free milk and nutritionally-equivalent non-dairy alternatives (to be defined by USDA); and offer organic products where available, vegan and soy options and vegetarian entrees. Increase servings of whole grains, vegetables and fruits offered.
  • implement HHFKA -Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Updated 2014
  • The nutritional content of meals will be made available to parents and students on menus, a website, or other point-of-purchase materials.

 Free and Reduced-Priced Meals

Schools will make every effort to eliminate any social stigma attached to, and prevent the overt identification of, students who are eligible for free and reduced-price school meals. Toward this end, schools may utilize electronic identification and payment systems to protect confidential student information and promote the availability of school meals to all students not just eligible students.

Breakfast

To ensure that all children have breakfast, either at home or at school, in order to meet their nutritional needs and enhance their ability to learn:

  • Schools will, to the extent possible, operate the School Breakfast Program.
  • Schools will, to the extent possible, arrange bus schedules and utilize methods to serve school breakfasts that encourage participation, including serving breakfast in the classroom, or breakfast during morning break or recess.
  • Schools that serve breakfast to students will notify parents and students of the availability of the School Breakfast Program and will encourage parents to provide a healthy breakfast for their children through newsletter articles, take-home materials, or other means.

 School Nutrition Environment Should Provide

  • Adequate time and space for seating should be provided for students to eat school meals. Lunch periods should be scheduled to reduce student wait time for meals.
  • Nutrition education should be provided at all grade levels, PK-12
  • Non-food rewards and incentives should be used when possible to encourage student achievement and desirable behavior.
  • School campus marketing and advertising should encourage healthy eating habits.
  • Water and water fountains should be usable and accessible to students during the school day.
  • Teachers and staff should be encouraged to model healthy eating and behaviors.
  • Healthy food choices should be provided when foods are sold as concessions at school sports events and special school activities.

 Meal Times and Scheduling Recommendations

  • Provide students with at least 10 minutes to eat after sitting down for breakfast and 20 minutes after sitting down for lunch;
  • Schedule lunch periods to follow recess periods (in elementary schools);
  • Schedule meal periods at appropriate times, e.g., lunch should be scheduled between 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. with exceptions for special programs;
  • Not schedule tutoring, club, or organizational meetings or activities during mealtimes, unless students may eat during such activities;
  • Insure students are offered a regular lunch meal period during the school day on minimum days.
  • Schedule lunches to minimize student wait times for meals, to insure that all students have access to a nutritional school meal and have adequate time to consume meal,
  • Provide students access to hand washing or hand sanitizing before they eat meals or snacks; and take reasonable steps to accommodate the tooth-brushing regimens of students with special oral health needs (e.g., orthodontia or high tooth decay risk).

The School Nutrition Environment The health of today’s school environment continues to improve. Students across the country are now offered healthier school meals with more fruits, vegetables and whole grains through the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program.  The Smart Snacks in School standards published by USDA builds upon those healthy advancements by ensuring that all other snack foods and beverages available for sale to students in school are tasty and nutritious.

Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) Requires that USDA establish nutrition standards for all foods and beverages sold in school beyond the Federal child nutrition programs in schools.

What are Competitive Foods? All food and beverages sold to students on school campus during the school day, other than meals reimbursable under programs authorized by the USDA, CDE, NSLA

The law specifies that the nutrition standards shall apply to all foods sold:

  • outside the school meal programs, on the school campus, and at any time during the school day.

Applicable areas include:

  • ala carte in the cafeteria, in school stores, snack bars, vending machines, other venues

Where do the Standards Apply?

  • School campus defined as all areas of the property under jurisdiction of the school that are accessible to students during the school day 

When Do the Standards Apply?

  • School day defined as the period from midnight before, to 30 minutes after the end of the official school day                                                                                                                                                    

 Elementary Schools

The District Nutrition Services Program will approve and provide all food and beverage sales to students in elementary schools per (HHFKA -Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act) and/or current regulations. Food in elementary schools should be sold as balanced meals. If available, foods and beverages sold individually should be limited to low-fat and non-fat milk, fruits, fruit juice, water and non-fried vegetables:

  • At no time during the school day until 1/2 hour after the end of the school day, may any sale compete with the National School Breakfast or Lunch program.  This does not pertain to food items made available by the District Nutrition Services Department                                                      

Middle /Junior High and High Schools

The District Nutrition Services Program will approve and provide all food and beverage sales to students in middle/junior high and high schools, all foods and beverages sold/served individually outside the reimbursable school meal programs (including those sold through a la carte [snack] lines, vending machines) during the school day per (HHFKA -Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act and/or current regulations), will meet the following nutrition and portion size standards:    

  • At no time during the school day until after the last lunch period has ended, may any sale compete with the National School Breakfast or Lunch program.      
  • This does not pertain to food items made available by the District Nutrition Services Department.

Fundraising Activities

To support children's health and school nutrition-education efforts, school fundraising activities may not compete with School Lunch or Breakfast programs. Schools should encourage fundraising activities that promote physical activity and nutritious food choices. The district may disseminate a list of suggested ideas for acceptable fundraising activities.                                                                                                                                      

Competitive Foods for Elementary Schools

The competitive foods policy section for elementary schools states that it does "not pertain to food items made available by the Nutrition Services Department." The intent of the policy is to encourage the consumption of nutritious food by students and to limit access to high-fat, high-sugar items during the school day. The only foods and beverages that may be made available to elementary school students on campus during the school day, at times other than meal periods, is a nutritious classroom snack allowed by the policy. This does not apply to student birthday parties or any other exemption as established by the policy. An elementary school campus may not sell or serve competitive foods (or provide access to them through direct or indirect sales) to students anywhere on school premises throughout the school day. (See HHFKA restrictions) This does not pertain to food items made available by the District Nutrition Services Department.

  • In elementary schools, all foods and beverages sold/served individually (to or by) students ½ hour after the school day will meet the nutrition standards meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually.

Competitive Foods for Secondary Schools: Middle/Junior High and High Schools

The competitive foods policy section for secondary schools states that it does "not pertain to food items made available by the Nutrition Services Department." In middle/junior high and high schools, all foods and beverages sold/served individually outside the reimbursable school meal programs (including those sold through ala-carte [snack] lines, vending machines) during the school day, will meet the following nutrition and portion size standards: At no time during the school day until after the last lunch period has ended, may any sale compete with the National School Breakfast or Lunch program.                                                                             

  • In middle/junior high and high schools, all foods and beverages sold/served individually (to or by) students after the school day will meet the nutrition standards meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually.                                                                                                        

Classroom Foods and Snacks Celebrations, Classroom Parties

The District recognizes that celebrating student special occasions with a classroom party is a time-honored tradition that provides the opportunity for parental involvement in the education of their children, which is beneficial for students, parents and teachers. The intent of the policy is to encourage the consumption of nutritious, well-balanced meals and to prevent competitive foods from being sold to students in place of the School Lunch & Breakfast Program. With the exception of school birthday parties, schools may not allow alternative meals to be provided to students in competition with meals made available by the District Nutrition Service Department under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. Such items may be provided if they are provided through the NSLP meal program and supplemented with components provided by Nutrition Services to become a reimbursable meal. This allows the addition of milk, fruits and vegetables for a complete nutritious meal as well as providing federal reimbursement funds to the district. It is recommended such parties be scheduled after the end of the lunch period for the class so that these celebrations will not replace a nutritious lunch. The district may disseminate a list of healthy party ideas to parents and teachers.

Snacks

Snacks served during the school day or in after-school care or enrichment programs will make a positive contribution to children's diets and health, with an emphasis on serving fruits and vegetables as the primary snacks and water as the primary beverage. Schools will assess if and when to offer snacks based on timing of school meals, children's nutritional needs, children's ages, and other considerations. 

The district will disseminate a list of healthful snack items to teachers, after-school program personnel, and parents.

  • If eligible, schools that provide snacks through after-school programs will pursue receiving reimbursements through the National School Lunch Program. 
  • An elementary school campus may not sell or serve competitive foods (or provide access to them through direct or indirect sales) to students anywhere on school premises throughout the school day until ½ hour after the end of the last scheduled class. This does not pertain to food items made available by the District Nutrition Services Department.

School-Sponsored Events (such as, but not limited to, athletic events, dances, or performances)  At least 50 percent of foods and beverages offered or sold at school-sponsored events outside the school day should meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually. 

Nutrition Services Food Safety Policy 

Food Safety, Outside Sales, Athletic Events at Permanent District Facilities  

The District recognizes the role of food in the activities of sites, departments and students organizations. In an effort to support schools, departments and student organizations and to ensure the safety of food provided on campus, organizations/groups shall adhere to the “District Facility Use Rules” and the “Nutrition Services Food Safety Policy, district HACCP plan and local Health Department regulations.” 

The purpose of this Nutrition Services Food Safety Policies is to establish standards for food service on all campuses, for the safety and consistency of the products provided and to insure public safety, reduce District liability.

The District requires:

  • Any food service or sale on any district property campus is to be in full compliance with State and County Health Department standards and other regulatory agencies. For the protection of the public, against foodborne illness or injury, established guidelines as provided by Environmental Health & Safety (California Retail Food Facilities Law)   must be followed for each type of event and applicable permits obtained.
  • Nutrition Services will be responsible for implementing food safety procedures HACCP as required by state and federal regulations.  An employee of the Nutrition & Food Services Department with a valid Food Manager certificate must be present during receiving, food preparation and sale of any food items at any district facility.  
  • California regulations require the presence of a certified sanitation person when food is prepared and or served in District facilities.  Additional charges for this person will be billed to the organization. Facility use charges may apply. 
  • Events where the sale of only pre-packaged retail-purchased items sold in a non-permanent facility or temporary area which is not required to maintain a Health Department permit nor inspected by the local Health Department or agency are exempt.)

Reducing Exposure to Communicable Diseases Schools should discourage students from trading or sharing their foods or beverages with one another during meal or snack times, in order to prevent the spread of disease, reduce exposure to food allergies and assist with student’s dietary restrictions. 

Qualifications of School Food Service Staff

As part of the school district's responsibility to operate a Nutrition Services program; we will provide continuing professional development for all nutrition professionals in schools. Staff development programs should include appropriate certification and/or training programs for child nutrition directors, school nutrition managers, and cafeteria workers, according to their levels of responsibility.

Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion and Food Marketing

Nutrition Education and Promotion

The District aims to teach, encourage, and support healthy eating by students. Schools should provide nutrition education and engage in nutrition promotion that:

  • is offered at each grade level as part of a sequential, comprehensive, standards-based program designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to promote and protect their health;
  • is part of not only health education classes, but also classroom instruction in subjects such as math, science, language arts, social sciences, and elective subjects;
  • includes enjoyable, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-relevant, participatory activities, such as contests, promotions, taste testing, farm visits, and school gardens;
  • promotes fruits, vegetables, whole grain products, low-fat and fat-free dairy products, healthy food preparation methods, and health-enhancing nutrition practices;
  • emphasizes caloric balance between food intake and energy expenditure (physical activity/exercise);
  • links with school meal programs, other school foods, and nutrition-related community services; 

Integrating Physical Activity into the Classroom Setting

For students to receive the nationally-recommended amount of daily physical activity and for students to fully embrace regular physical activity as a personal behavior, students need opportunities for physical activity beyond physical education class. 

Communications with Parents  

Join us Parent/PTA LWP Commitee participation

The district/school will support parents' efforts to provide a healthy diet and daily physical activity for their children. The district/school will offer nutrition information, nutrition tips on school websites, and provide nutrient analyses of school menus. Schools should encourage parents to pack healthy lunches and snacks and to refrain from including beverages and foods that do not meet the above nutrition standards for individual foods and beverages. The district/school may make available to parents a list of foods that meet the district's snack standards and ideas for healthy celebrations parties, rewards, and fundraising activities. The district/school should provide information about physical education and other school-based physical activity opportunities before, during, and after the school day; and support parents' efforts to provide their children with opportunities to be physically active outside of school. 

Food Marketing in Schools

School-based marketing will be consistent with nutrition education and health promotion. As such, schools will limit food and beverage marketing to the promotion of foods and beverages that meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually (per HHFKA 2014 and/or current regulations). School-based marketing of brands promoting predominantly low-nutrition foods and beverages is prohibited. The promotion of healthy foods, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products is encouraged. Marketing activities that promote healthful behaviors (and are therefore allowable) include: vending machine covers promoting water; pricing structures that promote healthy options in ala-carte lines or vending machines; sales of fruit for fundraisers; and coupons for discount gym memberships.

Monitoring and Policy Review    see our (Policy Assessment and Review)

Monitoring The superintendent or designee will ensure compliance with established district-wide nutrition and physical activity wellness policies. In each school, the principal or designee will ensure compliance with those policies in his/her school and will report on the school's compliance to the school district superintendent or designee.  School food service staff, at the school or district level, will ensure compliance with nutrition policies within school food service areas and will report on this matter to the superintendent or designee annually. In addition, the school district will report on the most recent USDA School Meals Initiative (SMI) review findings and any resulting changes. The superintendent or designee will develop a summary report every three years on district-wide compliance with the district's established nutrition and physical activity wellness policies, based on input from schools within the district. That report will be provided to the school board and also distributed to all school health councils, parent/teacher organizations, school principals, and school health services personnel in the district.

Policy Review In the initial development of the District's Wellness Policies, each school in the district would conduct a baseline assessment of the school's existing nutrition and physical activity environments and policies. The results of those school-by-school assessments will be compiled at the district level to identify and prioritize needs. Assessments will be repeated every three years to help review policy compliance, assess progress, and determine areas in need of improvement. As part of that review, the school district will review our nutrition and physical activity policies; provision of an environment that supports healthy eating and physical activity; and nutrition and physical education policies and program elements. The district, and individual schools within the district, will, as necessary, revise the wellness policies and develop work plans to facilitate their implementation.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov.

Students BP 5030

Student Wellness Policy 

The Board of Education recognizes the link between student health and learning and desires to provide a comprehensive program promoting healthy eating and physical activity for District students. The Superintendent or designee shall build a coordinated school health system that supports and reinforces health literacy through health education, physical education and activity, health services, nutrition services, psychological and counseling services, health promotion for staff, a safe and healthy school environment, and parent/guardian and community involvement. 

To encourage consistent health messages between the home and school environment, the Superintendent or designee may disseminate health information and/or the District's student wellness policy to parents/guardians through District or school newsletters, handouts, parent/guardian meetings, District and school web sites, and other communications. Outreach to parents/guardians shall emphasize the relationship between student health and academic performance. 

The Superintendent or designee shall permit parents/guardians, students, food service employees, physical education teachers, school health professionals, Board members, school administrators, and members of the public to participate in the development, implementation, and periodic review and update of the District's student wellness policy. (42 USC 1758b) 

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (42 USC 1758b) mandates each district participating in the National School Lunch Program (42 USC 1751-1769) or any program in the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 USC 1771-1791), including the School Breakfast Program, to adopt a districtwide school wellness policy. The following policy fulfills this mandate and should be revised to reflect district practice. Other policies in the district's policy manual will likely contain additional provisions supporting this wellness policy, such as BP 3312 - Contracts, BP/AR 3550 - Food Service/Child Nutrition Program, BP/AR 3552 - Summer Meal Program, BP/AR 3553 - Free and Reduced Price Meals, BP/AR 3554 - Other Food Sales, BP/AR 6142.7 - Physical Education and Activity, and BP/AR 6142.8 - Comprehensive Health Education. Nutritional Guidelines for Foods Available at School.  Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act:  Interim Final Rule Published: June 28, 2013; Requirements take effect July 1, 2014. 

Requires that USDA establish nutrition standards for all foods and beverages sold in school beyond the Federal child nutrition programs in schools. The law specifies that the nutrition standards shall apply to all foods sold: outside the school meal programs; on the school campus, and at any time during the school day. 

Applicability Including: a la carte in the cafeteria; in school stores; classroom parties, on campus sales, snack bars; vending machines and other venues.   

The “Smart Snacks in School”, standards published by USDA builds upon those healthy advancements by ensuring that all other snack foods and beverages available for sale to students in school are tasty and nutritious.

State and local flexibility: nutrition standards in interim final rule for all foods sold in school are minimum standards; State agencies and school districts may establish additional standards; State or local standards must be consistent with Federal standards.  

Competitive Foods defined: all food and beverages sold to students on school campus during the school day, other than meals reimbursable under programs authorized by the USDA, CDE, NSLA and the CAN. Where standards apply: on all school campus’ and all areas of the property under jurisdiction of the school that are accessible to students during the school day. When standards apply: During the school day; defined as the period from midnight before, to 30 minutes after the end of the official school day. 

42 USC 1758b mandates that the district's wellness policy include nutritional guidelines that are consistent with federal nutrition standards, as specified below.  Federal nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, as amended by 77 Fed. Reg. 17, are aligned with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Requirements for the National School Lunch Program (7 CFR 210.10) are effective July 1, 2012. Requirements for the School Breakfast Program (7 CFR 220.23) are applicable through the 2013-14 school year and then will be replaced by the requirements in 7 CFR 220.8.  See AR 3550 - Food Service/Child Nutrition Program.

Pursuant to 42 USC 1758, schools participating in the National School Lunch Program are required to make free drinking water available for consumption at locations where meals are served during meal service.  In addition, Education Code 38086 requires all California schools to make free drinking water available during school meal times, unless the Board adopts a resolution demonstrating that the district is unable to comply due to fiscal constraints or health or safety concerns. See AR 3550 - Food Service/Child Nutrition Program for policy language related to these requirements. Also see CSBA's policy brief Increasing Access to Drinking Water in Schools for further information and sample strategies for providing water and encouraging consumption. 

The Superintendent or designee shall provide access to free,  potable water during meal times in the food service area in accordance with Education Code 38086 and 42 USC 1758, and shall encourage students' consumption of water by educating them about the health benefits of water and serving water in an appealing manner.

Nutrition and Physical Activity Goals  

The Board shall adopt goals for nutrition promotion and education, physical activity, and other school-based activities that promote student wellness. (42 USC 1758b) 

The District's nutrition education and physical education programs shall be based on research, consistent with the expectations established in the state's curriculum frameworks and content standards, and designed to build the skills and knowledge that all students need to maintain a healthy lifestyle.  

Nutrition education shall be provided as part of the health education program and, as appropriate, shall be integrated into other academic subjects in the regular educational program. Nutrition education also may be offered through before- and after-school programs.

The Board prohibits the marketing and advertising of non-nutritious foods and beverages through signage, vending machine fronts, logos, scoreboards, school supplies, advertisements in school publications, coupon or incentive programs, free give-aways, or other means.  

All students shall be provided opportunities to be physically active on a regular basis. Opportunities for moderate to vigorous physical activity shall be provided through physical education and recess and may also be provided through school athletic programs, extracurricular programs, before- and after-school programs, programs encouraging students to walk or bicycle to and from school, in-class physical activity breaks, and other structured and unstructured activities. 

Students BP 5030 

The Board may enter into a joint use agreement to make District facilities or grounds available for recreational or sports activities outside the school day and/or to use community facilities to expand students' access to opportunity for physical activity.

The Superintendent or designee shall encourage staff to serve as positive role models for healthy eating and physical fitness. He/she shall promote work-site wellness and may provide opportunities for regular physical activity among employees. Professional development may include instructional strategies that assess health knowledge and skills and promote healthy behaviors.

For all foods available on each campus during the school day, the District shall adopt nutritional guidelines which are consistent with 42 USC 1773 and 1779 and support the objectives of promoting student health and reducing childhood obesity. (42 USC 1758b)

The Board believes that foods and beverages available to students at District schools should support the health curriculum and promote optimal health, taking into consideration the needs of students with special dietary needs. Nutritional standards adopted by the District for all foods and beverages sold to students, including foods and beverages provided through the District's food service program, student stores, vending machines, or other venues, shall meet or exceed state and federal nutritional standards.

In order to maximize the District's ability to provide nutritious meals and snacks, all District schools shall participate in available federal school nutrition programs, including the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs and after-school snack programs, to the extent possible. When approved by the California Department of Education, the District may sponsor a summer meal program.

The Superintendent or designee shall encourage school organizations to use healthy food items or non-food items for fundraising purposes. He/she also shall encourage school staff to avoid the use of non-nutritious foods as a reward for students' academic performance, accomplishments, or classroom behavior.

School staff shall encourage parents/guardians or other volunteers to support the District's nutrition education program by considering nutritional quality when selecting any snacks which they may donate for occasional class parties. Class parties or celebrations shall be held after the lunch period when possible.

Program Implementation and Evaluation

The Superintendent shall designate one or more District or school employees, as appropriate, to ensure that each school site complies with this policy. (42 USC 1758b)  The Superintendent or designee shall inform and update the public, including parents/guardians, students, and others in the community, about the contents and implementation of this policy. He/she shall periodically measure and make available to the public an assessment of the extent to which District schools are in compliance with this policy, the extent to which this policy compares to model wellness policies available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and a description of the progress made in attaining the goals of the wellness policy. (42 USC 1758b)

The Board and the Superintendent or designee shall establish indicators that will be used to measure the implementation and effectiveness of the district activities related to student wellness.  Such indicators may include, but are not limited to:

Students BP 5030

  1. Descriptions of the district's nutrition education, physical education, and health education curricula and the extent to which they align with state academic content standards and legal requirements
  2. An analysis of the nutritional content of school meals and snacks served in all district programs, based on a sample of menus and production records
  3. Student participation rates in all school meal and/or snack programs, including the number of students enrolled in the free and reduced-price meals program compared to the number of students eligible for that program
  4. Extent to which foods sold on campus outside the food services program, such as through vending machines, student stores, or fundraisers, comply with nutritional standards
  5. Results of the state's physical fitness test at applicable grade levels
  6. Number of minutes of physical education offered at each grade span, and the estimated percentage of class time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity
  7. A description of district efforts to provide additional opportunities for physical activity outside of the physical education program
  8. A description of other districtwide or school-based wellness activities offered, including the number of sites and/or students participating, as appropriate

The Superintendent or designee shall invite feedback on district and school wellness activities from food service personnel, school administrators, the school health council, parents/guardians, students, teachers, before- and after-school program staff, and/or other appropriate persons.

As feasible, the assessment report may include a comparison of results across multiple years, a comparison of district data with county, statewide, or national data, and/or a comparison of wellness data with other student outcomes such as academic indicators or student discipline rates. 

The Superintendent or designee shall inform and update the public, including parents/guardians, students, and others in the community, about the content and implementation of this policy and assessment results.  (42 USC 1758b)

In addition, the assessment results shall be submitted to the Board for the purposes of evaluating policy and practice, recognizing accomplishments, and making policy adjustments as needed to focus district resources and efforts on actions that are most likely to make a positive impact on student health and achievement.

 

Students BP 5030

 Legal Reference:

EDUCATION CODE

33350-33354  CDE responsibilities re: physical education

49430-49434  Pupil Nutrition, Health, and Achievement Act of 2001

49490-49494  School breakfast and lunch programs

49500-49505  School meals

49510-49520  Nutrition

49530-49536  Child Nutrition Act

49540-49546  Child care food program

49547-49548.3  Comprehensive nutrition services

49550-49561  Meals for needy students

49565-49565.8  California Fresh Start pilot program

49570  National School Lunch Act

51210  Course of study, grades 1-6

51220  Course of study, grades 7-12

51222 Physical education

51223  Physical education, elementary schools

51795-51796.5  School instructional gardens

51880-51921  Comprehensive health education

CODE OF REGULATIONS, TITLE 5

15500-15501  Food sales by student organizations

15510  Mandatory meals for needy students

15530-15535  Nutrition education

15550-15565  School lunch and breakfast programs

UNITED STATES CODE, TITLE 42

1751-1769  National School Lunch Program, especially:

1758b Local wellness policy

1771-1791  Child Nutrition Act, especially:

1773  School Breakfast Program

1779  Rules and regulations, Child Nutrition Act 

CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS, TITLE 7

210.1-210.31  National School Lunch Program

220.1-220.23  National School Breakfast Program

CODE OF REGULATIONS, TITLE 5

15500-15501 Food sales by student organizations

15510 Mandatory meals for needy students

15530-15535 Nutrition education

15550-15565 School lunch and breakfast programs

UNITED STATES CODE, TITLE 42

1751-1769 National School Lunch Program, especially:

1758b Local wellness policy

1771-1791 Child Nutrition Act, including:

1773 School Breakfast Program

1779 Rules and regulations, Child Nutrition Act

CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS, TITLE 7

210.1-210.31 National School Lunch Program

220.1-220.21 National School Breakfast Program

Adopted: (5-06) 4-12 Orange, California                                                                                   ORANGE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT